How to feed?

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering' started by Buttsmom, Oct 22, 2012.

  1. Buttsmom

    Buttsmom New Member

    24
    0
    0
    My other half wants to just have small dishes to put the food and water in for the chickens. I told him everyone has some kind of dispenser for both, either store bought or homemade. His plan at the moment is to just cut off the bottom of a couple 5 gallon buckets and use those, will that be ok? The chickens for now will be 3 Columbian Wyandotte Hens and a Welsummer Rooster, with plans to add more chickens when I find some others in the area that I like.
     
  2. 7chicks

    7chicks New Member

    3,192
    0
    0
    I'm always switching up my feeders. My girls don't really care just so long as they have food & water available. I don't do the store bought feeders. Had bought them because they seemed to be the thing to do. Personally, I don't like them so they were a waste of $ to me. I just use a couple over size dog dishes for now for the food. One is a low lip metal pan since I have a banty now besides the big girls. One of their water dishes is simply an icecream bucket. Another is a big bucket with only part of a side cut out. That one is in their coop & I made it this way to help keep the woodchips from flying inside.
     

  3. Buttsmom

    Buttsmom New Member

    24
    0
    0
    Thank you, one more question. Their coop is in our pole barn, their run for winter is also in the pole barn. We are going to lock them in the coop at night so that we have less worries about predators. Should we have food and water in their coop at night when they are locked up?
     
  4. 7chicks

    7chicks New Member

    3,192
    0
    0
    Water is fine, food I put up. Just entices the rodents.
     
  5. Buttsmom

    Buttsmom New Member

    24
    0
    0
    Thanks again.
     
  6. BootedBantam

    BootedBantam New Chicken Mom

    596
    0
    0
    I do layer pellets in the morning, veggies and greens for lunch, and cracked corn at bedtime..I raise the plastic water container on a brick and use heavy dog bowls for food or sprinkle it all on ground. Whatever you choose, make sure it is easy to clean and raised up so they don't get their feet in it.

    I like this chart
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Oct 24, 2012
  7. Roslyn

    Roslyn A Round American Woman

    735
    0
    0
    The store bought feeders are all designed the same for a reason. Chickens will make a mess of both feed and water if allowed. The feed needs to be raised to keep it off the floor because of rats/mice and also to keep it from being soiled by poo. Water is best put up on a cement block so that they don't put dirty feet in it or so they don't jump on it and turn it over. A spilled waterer in the coop with straw and poo smells very nasty.

    If you only use dog type bowls they will scratch at it, and maybe turn it over and if the water is near, they could do the same. If water mixes with the feed it will be mush quickly. If they don't quickly eat the mush, then mold can set it, and that isn't good for them.

    You can get small feeders and waterers and mine are aluminum and have lasted the whole 10 years that I have used them. I did have the handle fall off one and it no longer held water (no vacuum) . They may seem expensive, but mine have lasted.

    I don't have a natural water supply in the chicken area, and I keep two large waterers and a large black tub (used for concrete mixing) and I'm always shocked at how much water they drink.
     
  8. mcderry1967

    mcderry1967 New Member

    19
    0
    0
    For water during the summer I used old roasting pans or dog bowls. In the coop I use plastic waters meant for chickens. Putting the bowls or waters up off the ground also help keep things clean & dry.
     
  9. stu-hens

    stu-hens New Member

    68
    0
    0
    i use hanging feeders in the covered run but bring them both in at night water at this time of year to stop freezing and feeders as i have now found a mouse happily tucking in to layers pellets even with it hanging a foot off the ground i guess they climb up and over i wondered why it was going down so fast and dont want them getting disease,a bit concerned that i have mice i keep feed in a dustbin but i guess as its winter and the hens go to roost at 4pm now and im not back from work til 7pm they still have 3 hours to help themselves to feeders what else can i do??
     
  10. CharlieEcho

    CharlieEcho Junior Member

    106
    0
    0
    Rubber dishes; homemade feeder;

    Back high is a rule I like. That is keep the waterer and feeder about as high as the chickens back. They can easily reach the feed and water and the highth will keep them from making too big a mess. They still splash a little of both, but not enough to be sloppy.

    We have the feeders set away from the waterers so that any feed spilled will remain dry and not as subject to getting mushy and stinking. We have commercial heated waterer because it's getting cold. I've made our own feeders and used the 2" x 4" wire fencing as spacers. They can get their heads inside the wire sections to eat and not have one of the birds standing in and using the feeders for something else:confused:. I like to make things anyhow.

    Our chickens have access to the feed and water all during the day and night. We have a light on a timer to get them going in the morning and to guide them to their roost as the sun is setting. They get at least 12 hours of light per day during the short winter days. We keep the supplemented feed in the hen house feeder mixed with cracked corn. The barn feeder and outside scratch is a mix of scratch grains, corn and oats.
    We give them treats now and then of chopped acorn and even dried meal worms.


    Outdoors we have rubber dishes or bowls. These are the heavy black rubber dishes. About like the rubber from tires. We turn them upside down each night and fill them fresh each morning. The black rubber absorbes heat on a sunny day and the ice is easy to break out. We also have two, 2 gallon rubber buckets we treat the same way. These are for our ducks too.

    We have a cat that likes to spend lots of time inside the hen house and in the nesting boxes in the barn. We also have "rat boxes" placed in various places in the barn and one in the hen house. We have used these for several years and not had problems. Knock on wood we don't often see any mice.

    I've added pictures today. 12/05
    The enclosed box can last up to three or even four days if we fill it up. It fits under the nesting boxes in the hen house. They seem to enjoy it as the feed really goes. The open feeder is placed in the barn for them. The round wooden bar on the top keeps them from perching on the feeder because it rotates.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Dec 5, 2012