Aggressive Roosters

Discussion in 'Behavior & Flock Management' started by chklve, Jun 19, 2012.

  1. chklve

    chklve New Member

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    My wife has a hard time getting attacked by an aggressive rooster. It's to the point she wants to get rid of him. To my understanding there's nothing that can be done about it.

    Am I wrong?
     
  2. Apyl

    Apyl New Member

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    There are 2 options. 1) make it dinner 2) try to tame it. I prefer the 1st choice but if you want to try to tame it, pick it up and carry it around with you for about 10 minutes a day. This may take a while and may not always work. It all depends on the rooster. My opinion is to have chicken dinner. I recently culled 4 aggresive rooster and am glad I did. My flock has greatly calmed down since.
     

  3. Sundancers

    Sundancers New Member

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    An aggressive rooster can and will hurt someone given half a chance ... I would also go with the chicken dinner. ;)
     
  4. Berta

    Berta New Member

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    Freezer camp.
     
  5. LdMorgan

    LdMorgan New Member

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    Chicken soup is the best solution for a bad rooster.

    Mean roosters will often beat up hens, rip feathers out & literally peck them to death That is especially likely if you have two maturing roosters in a small flock.

    One rooster usually needs about eight hens to really be happy. Any less and he's liable to get onery. Crowding ln the roosts or run will aggravate the problem.
     
  6. jjwilson72000

    jjwilson72000 New Member

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    You can also try kicking it....repeadetly, in the face. It will take a beating and won't quit for a long time but when it does he should see you/the wife as higher on the pecking order and quit attacking.

    Kind of like a dog if you can Up-Alpha them they get the point eventually.

    Or eat him, they are extremely replaceable every summer.
     
  7. piglett

    piglett Senior Member

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    my wife is from the Philippines & she makes great chicken adobo


    problem solved!!!


    piglett
     
  8. Roslyn

    Roslyn A Round American Woman

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    If you start VERY young you may have a chance, but once you start fighting with a rooster he will always be ready for a fight. I have dealt with more than my share of nasty boys over the years and I really do recommend eating them as soon as they start to show aggressive behavior.

    My youngest to date was three weeks. I had a batch of 12 peeps. At three weeks the rooster combs pop out and it's easy to pick them out from females. Well, at three weeks I also take my peeps outside into their junior run. So, there I am in flip-flops and one peep just tore into my toes. "He" was jumping at my ankles and pinching my toes and twisting. Looking back it really did hurt. Once I stepped back and took a good look I saw that his comb was bigger than the others, that's when I knew. I had a little roo in my batch of ONLY females. I paid extra for only females. Needless to say he was a nightmare and ended up in the cooking pot before he even made it to his first crow!! :eek:
     
  9. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe New Member

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    I wasn't going to bring that solution up but since you did, I'll add my tale. Our first rooster was BAD. As soon as you walked into the run he was on you. Even when he was out running free during the day he would still attack as you got near the coop. One day he came at me and I had decided I'd had enough as he already torn one pair of pants. I hauled off and kicked him; hard. He flew about 15' and just laid there. I thought I had killed him which was not my intention. I walked over to him and gave a little nudge with my boot and he jumped up and ran away. Never had another problem with him.
     
  10. Riverdale

    Riverdale New Member

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    There is no good way of taming an ornery 'roo. We have had several mean ones, from 'homicidal' Henry to Rusty.
    Henry killed (really) several hens.
    Rusty was very agressive, my son would not go into the run without his 'Rusty-stick' (a piece of bamboo aboout 5 ' long, part of an onld fishing rod).

    They were both 'rehabbed' via the stock pot ;)

    The only benefit we got from Rusty is Peach (our current 'roo) was raised under Rusty's 'authoritarian regime', so he's a bit calmer....
     
  11. LdMorgan

    LdMorgan New Member

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    We once had a rooster named Herbie that was like a rabid Grizzly on Methamphetamines. He wasn't afraid of anyrhing.
    I vividly remember watching my daughter (age 9) doing egg duty one morning, walking around the run with her feet in two plastic 5-gal buckets to keep Herbie from eating her toes. I also remember him vociferously challenging a passing helicopter, daring it to come down & fight like a chicken!

    Poor Herbie: He was good with the hens, just VERY protective. When he eventually went into the stewpot (in the Fullness of Time) he was so tough that we literally had to simmer him for three days to make him edible.

    I think I still miss Herbie. He had personality.
     
  12. jn4

    jn4 New Member

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    I had an Americana that was very aggressive....he made a fine watch-dog! This crazy bird would try to attack me when I mowed the fields He hated that mower....or was it me? The grand kids were scared to death of him and he would come after anything in the yard that moved. We have a big old Newfoundland Dog that weighs in about 200 lbs (give or take a few pounds) and the dog would stay clear of that ole rooster.
    We eventually made chicken broth out of him after he attacked one of the kids and gashed up her legs pretty badly......
     
  13. Catfish

    Catfish New Member

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    I got a rooster that likes to flog you.
    I've tamed him by showing him who the Alpha male is, ME.
    I crouch down like he does and when he goes to flog, I reach down and grab him.
    then I keep him in a tight clutch and go about the chores of feeding and watering, etc.
    Then I put him down and he typically calms down.
    When he gets on the aggressive side, I repeat. I also play his game and when he
    goes to flog, I kick him, sometimes hard enough you would think it would hurt.
    But it never does. The last few times I've started to really calm him down and
    he not nearly as aggressive.
    He has 2 1/2" spurs too, I'll catch him once in a while and trim the back to dull
    them too.
     
  14. EMO

    EMO New Member

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    I'm the one that gets attacked at our house, they leave the wife and kids alone. The only thing that works for me is to keep 4' sticks near each gate. When I enter, a sticks goes with me. Keep it extended out from me touching the ground. I think it makes me seem bigger or something because he won't bother me when I have it. If I enter without it, he comes right at me.
     
  15. abluechipstock

    abluechipstock New Member

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    i've always done the featherduster method, when one attacks me i grab him by the legs and clean the cob webs and dirt from around the coop, when i put him down he thinks twice before giving me the stink-eye!
     
  16. CartersLegacy

    CartersLegacy New Member

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    ^lol @abluechipstock! Sounds like what my wife did with one of our mean Barred Rock Roosters! We also have a very aggressive white leghorn roo. We have started penning them to the ground when they show their aggressive side and letting them know they are not dominate over us. So far so good. We will see how long this last. It's been two weeks since one came after us, and it used to be every day. We just hold them down for about 5 minutes and when you let them up, they scurry off and behave themselves.
     
  17. cindy

    cindy New Member

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    this is NOT the way to deal with any aggressive animal! and NO it's NOT kind of like a dog! I breed and raise Rottweilers to get respect you have to earn it and be firm but fair! beating any animal of any kind is NOT a solution! shame on you I really hope you don't own many animals...Up-Alpha???..pure ignorance! :mad:

    cull the Roo and have him for dinner make his life worth something..remember its an animal they do what comes natural so dont take it personal.
     
  18. UncleJoe

    UncleJoe New Member

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    Cindy, I must respectfully disagree.
    You are 100% correct in that a chicken in NOT like a dog. I would NEVER kick a dog trying to bring it into submission. We have 7 of them. Most dogs want to please you.
    But a chicken has a completely different mindset. Several Roos together will fight for dominance. If you have a very dominant roo, he will challenge you if he feels you are a threat to the girls in his domain. We have a big, beautiful BR roo that had a bit of an attitude. After being spurred a couple times, I cornered him in the coop and put him in a dog crate for a few days. Every day I would grab a hen and walk to the crate and show him that the girls were mine and he came second. When I let him out he seemed to understand. He will now follow me around without attacking because he knows I'm the alpha in the flock. I still pick up one of the girls every couple days and carry her around just so he can see it.
    So showing an aggressive roo who is #1 is a viable solution to the problem. Just my personal experience.
     
  19. cindy

    cindy New Member

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    I've had many dominate Roo's! their in the freezer! I don't care what kind of animal it is... this "You can also try kicking it....repeatedly, in the face"
    is not the solution. your method of crating/carrying around is a long way from kicking it in the face repeatedly!
    funny yesterday we were all talking about humane ways to cull yet today abuse is being condoned...
    there's much better ways to show/teach dominance without inflicting physical pain. YOU just mentioned one very
    good method.
     
  20. Roslyn

    Roslyn A Round American Woman

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    I did teach a younger rooster manners by locking him up in the coop with my two older boys.

    He was much more respectful of the rules after that.